It’s weird

It’s weird that I can rattle off a huge number of books I found bad, but when, in a conversation, it came to recommending ones I legitimately enjoyed, I had to struggle a bit.

Maybe I could recommend books I found enjoyably bad or mediocre to see if others liked them unreservedly?

A Holiday Song

Most holiday songs are either repetitive classics, glitzy pop with thematic lyrics, or, at their absolute worst, repetitive classics produced in the style of glitzy pop. Thankfully, I heard one that doesn’t fit the category.

That song is The Pretenders’ 2000 Miles. And it wasn’t even intended as a holiday song per se, instead being in remembrance of a lost bandmate. Yet somehow it also works for the seeming meaning of people separated by a long distance. I guess it’s that good.

I guess I have the image of the song playing as the camera pans over a winter battlefield littered with bodies, broken tanks and artillery, and ends up with, as the lyrics describe, people singing in a nearby town.

Hoxton’s Housewarming Party

The latest Payday 2 super-event is over, and I’m glad to say that Overkill learned their lesson from the mess that was Crimefest 2015. (They even poked fun at it with the trailer).

Not only was the content far less controversial than the microtransactions of last year, but the lack of a challenge meant that it was not going to be overhyped like the last time.

I like the new safehouse, even if the “raid” missions are a little too Warframe-y for my tastes. In all, it was a good event.

The Alternate History Line

What separates good alternate history online from bad alternate history online (besides the usual literary qualities)? I think it’s whether or not the authors have a “not one step back” attitude.

Not whether or not they’re willing to defend their choices, but how willing they are to let implausibilities slide, to treat fiction like fiction instead of “This is my genius, so I’m offended that you’d attack my genius”.

This is why I liked a story called “Zhirinovsky’s Russian Empire” for all its flaws (including a contrived way of getting the title character into office in the first place), while the work in previous Bad Fiction Spotlights stood out for authors who stubbornly defended every last bit.