The OPFOR Mega-Collection At Baloogan Campaign

I’ve long had a strange love of the “OPFORs”, those exercise-fodder wrestling heel countries, and an even stranger desire to read documents that were hundreds of pages long and written in field-manualese for fun. So it’s no surprise that my collection of un/declassified documents grew bigger and bigger.

After my latest finds, I decided that the time was right to share them, so I made an official post detailing the “OPFOR Volume 3” and containing the access at Baloogan Campaign.

I had to collate them. In part because all of them were just too big to fit into one folder effectively, and in part because, even if I could handle the size, it would be too “jumbly”. Thankfully, I was able to come up with three categories. The first was “fake countries, the OPFOR manuals” I’d used in the first two volumes. The second was specific intelligence assessments on real countries at the time-ie, the famous FM 100-2 manual series on the Soviet Army. The third was miscellaneous commentaries that, even though most did apply to the “real countries”, didn’t quite have the same theme.

So they’re ordered and ready for your perusal.

Some blog updates

I’ve been doing some blog “housework”, for lack of a better word. I got rid of some old defunct blogs no one was reading and I wasn’t updating, and I’ve made some changes to both my main blogs.

As always, I’m still changing more, so don’t be surprised if it looks slightly different.

A major blog announcement

So, you may have noticed that the blog has changed a lot. I have a few reasons for this. When I started up this blog almost three years ago, the minimalist theme worked very well. But I’ve felt it has outgrown that.

I’ve set up the Fuldapocalypse Fiction blog to provide more structured, less cluttered reviews. The first such review there is of Bob Forrest-Webb’s Chieftains, a classic tank novel. More are coming-many more.

Setting that up, I liked the theme and felt it was time to do the much-needed revamp of the Creative Corner. So I’ll be tinkering with the site, fair warning if anything changes. In the meantime, enjoy the new Coiler’s Creative Corner. The cars in the header are the notoriously “quirky” Fiat Multipla‘s. I figured they suited a quirky blog.

So I’m excited about this change. It was easier than I thought, and it’s been long overdue.

 

A look behind the scenes at Northern Fury

So, on the Northern Fury Project blog, scenario author Bart “Gunner98” Gauvin explains how the parts of the story become Command scenarios in the latest post. It’s an excellent post, and I’d like to add a few thoughts on it, from my own Command experience.

First, I cannot emphasize enough how much I agree with this sentence. “To make a good two-sided scenario, in my opinion, takes about three times as much effort as making a one-sided one, not to mention probably four times the playtesting effort.” Both of us have made two-sided Command Live scenarios, so we have experience with these. I’ve found that for trying to create a specific type of, for lack of a better word, “feel” in a scenario, trying both that and making it viable by both sides is far trickier-not impossible, but trickier-than having it be one-sided. And a lot of the Northern Fury scenarios aim for that kind of feel.

Second, briefings. I tend to be as basic about the briefings as possible, but now and then like to have some fun with them. Hint-they don’t have to be completely accurate…

Third, and this could be worth a post by itself, I’d be interested in seeing how the “canonical” losses are determined for a scenario set. The player could either succeed brilliantly or fail miserably. But how does that average into the assets  for the next scenario in the same place?

Still, a very fascinating, very effective post.