Outgrowing a game

I think I’ve outgrown Payday 2. I don’t regret the time and money spent on it-it was very fun and worked very well. But now with the story (such as it is) concluded, all I’m left with is, when I try to go back to it, I just find a mindless wave fighter in a clunky, badly optimized engine that I was losing some interest in before (for the last few updates I would return to the game for a bit, play them, and then go back).

I had fun with it, but I think I’ve played out my time in Payday 2. I’ll remember doing the classics like Hoxton Breakout and Big Bank, maybe being the only person who unironically liked Henry’s Rock, and just running the easy early heists again and again for relaxation. But now it’s done.

A Military Sci-Fi Craving

So, I’ve been having a military sci-fi craving, with most of the books I’ve recently started being those. Maybe it’s just a fad of mine. Maybe it’s just that a lot of them fall into the niche of being both cheap thrillers and involving something different than the usual ones, so I can have my cake and eat it too.

I’m not thinking any worse of the “normal” cheap thrillers, and I’m still reading lots of them, but it never hurts to try these new ones. I’ve had times when I like military sci-fi before, and this is another, I suppose.

Some appeal after all

A lot can change in a while. About a year ago, I wrote a post where I held that special forces held little appeal to me. Now, after reading my share of “commando fiction” (for lack of a better term), I’ve grown fonder of it and fonder of “special forces” characters.

I guess I’ve just had the fortune of seeing them done better than the few examples I’d seen before.

Changed Tastes

In some ways concerning fiction, I’ve become far less judgemental. In others, I’ve become far, far more so. In some cases, it’s authors I used to like becoming bad, in others it’s me changing in tastes and sophistication, and seeing them as bad.

Three “rules” remain for me:

  • The more something is hyped, the more skeptical I become.
  • If something aims low, I will be less critical than if it aims high.
  • I will find criticism of everything, even stuff that I like. But fiction without pretense is critic-proof.