Some blog updates

I’ve been doing some blog “housework”, for lack of a better word. I got rid of some old defunct blogs no one was reading and I wasn’t updating, and I’ve made some changes to both my main blogs.

As always, I’m still changing more, so don’t be surprised if it looks slightly different.

A major blog announcement

So, you may have noticed that the blog has changed a lot. I have a few reasons for this. When I started up this blog almost three years ago, the minimalist theme worked very well. But I’ve felt it has outgrown that.

I’ve set up the Fuldapocalypse Fiction blog to provide more structured, less cluttered reviews. The first such review there is of Bob Forrest-Webb’s Chieftains, a classic tank novel. More are coming-many more.

Setting that up, I liked the theme and felt it was time to do the much-needed revamp of the Creative Corner. So I’ll be tinkering with the site, fair warning if anything changes. In the meantime, enjoy the new Coiler’s Creative Corner. The cars in the header are the notoriously “quirky” Fiat Multipla‘s. I figured they suited a quirky blog.

So I’m excited about this change. It was easier than I thought, and it’s been long overdue.

 

A look behind the scenes at Northern Fury

So, on the Northern Fury Project blog, scenario author Bart “Gunner98” Gauvin explains how the parts of the story become Command scenarios in the latest post. It’s an excellent post, and I’d like to add a few thoughts on it, from my own Command experience.

First, I cannot emphasize enough how much I agree with this sentence. “To make a good two-sided scenario, in my opinion, takes about three times as much effort as making a one-sided one, not to mention probably four times the playtesting effort.” Both of us have made two-sided Command Live scenarios, so we have experience with these. I’ve found that for trying to create a specific type of, for lack of a better word, “feel” in a scenario, trying both that and making it viable by both sides is far trickier-not impossible, but trickier-than having it be one-sided. And a lot of the Northern Fury scenarios aim for that kind of feel.

Second, briefings. I tend to be as basic about the briefings as possible, but now and then like to have some fun with them. Hint-they don’t have to be completely accurate…

Third, and this could be worth a post by itself, I’d be interested in seeing how the “canonical” losses are determined for a scenario set. The player could either succeed brilliantly or fail miserably. But how does that average into the assets  for the next scenario in the same place?

Still, a very fascinating, very effective post.

Being myself

I’ve blogged here for over two years now, and my topics have ranged from the ultra-serious, as with the COIN wargaming post, to the silly and goofy, from the mundane to the strange.

It’s OK. I’ve spent so much time and effort long ago trying to be PLAIN AND NORMAL (caps on purpose) that didn’t work. I’m myself. Sometimes I have to remind myself of my own strength, and say “Coiler, be Coiler. You don’t have to be, or write like _____. Just be yourself.” And I’m taking that lesson to heart.

Being more tolerant of myself has also helped me become a lot more tolerant of other people and their tastes as well, I’ve found. So it’s very helpful and useful overall to me.